Inventing Medieval Czechoslovakia 1918–1968

Between Slavs, Germans, and Totalitarian Regimes

edited by Ivan Foletti and Adrien Palladino
Collana: PARVA Convivia, 3
Pubblicazione: Dicembre 2019
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Edizione cartacea
pp. 200, 13x19,5 cm, bross.
ISBN: 9788833133102
€ 25,00 -15% € 21,25
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Is it possible to “invent” the past? Through a series of studies, this volume explores the history of how this process occurred in Czechoslovakia within the period from about the end of the First World War until the 1960s. It focuses specifically on the re-invention of the “national” Middle Ages at the background of the meeting of different linguistic and ethnic groups — Czechs, Slovaks, Germans, and Russians — where one group would often negate, reshape, and ignore the point of view of the other, within an increasingly fractured political geography of the country.

The presented case studies show how research on medieval artworks and objects could become a fertile ground for the creation of ideological tools and narratives. In this way, understanding the historiography of art history also contributes to redefining Central Europe as a place of transcultural encounters and dialogues, beyond historical ruptures.

  • Medieval Art and Czechoslovakia. Between Nationalist Discourse and Transcultural Reality, an Introduction Ivan Foletti & Adrien Palladino
  • Ondřej Jakubec, National Stereotypes and the Slavic Character of Art in the Czech Lands. The Middle Ages and the “Czech Renaissance” in Czech Historiography of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
  • Ivan Foletti, Russian Inputs in Czechoslovakia: When Art History meets History The Institutum Kondakovianum during the Nazi occupation
  • Jan Klípa, Medieval Art in Silesia: A Battlefield of National Historiographies
  • Adrien Palladino & Sabina Rosenbergová, An Artist Between Two Worlds? Anton Pilgram in Czech-speaking and German-speaking Historiographies
  • Jan Galeta, Images and Reflections of Medieval Brno in the Nineteenth and Twentieth century
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